In less than 20 years, the oilsands have gone from nearly unknown to inspirational to intensely divisive. The journey reveals much about both the future of the energy sector and the potential of the environmental movement to make change. At its heart lays a single pipeline project — Keystone XL. 
OpenCanada

WEEKLY DISPATCH

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End of an oilsands love affair

oilsands
In less than 20 years, the oilsands have gone from nearly unknown to inspirational to intensely divisive. The journey reveals much about both the future of the energy sector and the potential of the environmental movement to make change. At its heart lays a single pipeline project — Keystone XL. 
By Jason Switzer and Dan Zilnik
o-editor

Welcome to the new OpenCanada

Until now, OpenCanada has served as both a media platform and the homepage of the Canadian International Council. Today, we launch as a new, stand-alone site. Here's why, and what you can expect next.
By Taylor Owen
Simon Prades

Back to Nigeria: Stories from the battle against Boko Haram

With essays from Wole Soyinka, Tolu Ogunlesi and several others, this series turns our attention back to Nigeria.
In partnership with the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies
dollars

What Canada's election campaign has missed: The inequality debate

Historically, lower income groups in Canada have been the least likely to vote, but that’s no reason not to prioritize income inequality this election. Why has this campaign focused on the middle class instead? 
By Catherine Tsalikis
Afghan-detainee

How Canada failed Afghan detainees

Canada knowingly transferred detainees in Afghanistan to facilities where torture was rife. Since then, the Canadian government has avoided all accountability. This is our unfinished business.
By Peggy Mason and Omar Sabry

BEST OF THE WEB

The New Yorker

New world disorder

Russian president Vladimir Putin and American president Barack Obama have two very different views when it comes to how to how to stem the civil war in Syria. As they both shore up their positions in the Middle East and North Africa, a ‘new world disorder’ becomes increasingly apparent. Philip Gourevitch reports for The New Yorker.
The Star

The nightmares of child soldiers

Christian Mafigiri and Marc Ellison have produced a graphic novel for the Toronto Star, depicting the stories of four former female child soldiers abducted by Joseph Kony’s rebel army in Uganda. The collaboration is a very different – and very effective – way of telling these women’s stories of tragedy and survival.

UPCOMING EVENTS

CIC Logo - White Square

Islamic Terrorism: The Psycho-Social Foundation

Oct. 21, 2015, CIC - Ottawa
A discussion with Middle East practitioner-scholars Michael Bell and John Bell on the issues that contribute to the dysfunction of Arab polities.
Bill Graham Centre Logo - White Square

George W. Bush: An American Tragedy

Oct. 22, 2015, BGCCIH - Toronto
Biographer Jean Smith discusses America’s forty-third President, the subject of his forthcoming biography.
CIGI Acronym Logo

Global Youth Forum: The [email protected]

Oct. 23, 2015, CIGI - Waterloo
The CIGI Global Youth Forum is a combination of trans-media storytelling, classroom simulation, an art exhibit, and historical film analysis for groups of high school students.

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OpenCanada.org is a publication of the Centre for International Governance Innovation.