The Trudeau government announced new security legislation last month, including the creation of a “super” watchdog that will oversee existing agencies. But do we still lack an understanding of what these agencies do? Michael Petrou runs through the evolution — and surveillance capabilities — of the RCMP, CSIS and CSE. 
OpenCanada

WEEKLY DISPATCH

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Surveillance in Canada: Who are the watchers?

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The Trudeau government announced new security legislation last month, including the creation of a “super” watchdog that will oversee existing agencies. But do we still lack an understanding of what these agencies do? Michael Petrou runs through the evolution — and surveillance capabilities — of the RCMP, CSIS and CSE.
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What you need to know about this year's G20

This year, G20-host Germany is pushing for a consensus on climate policy, the refugee crisis and corruption. Can Merkel build enough support to sideline Trump? By Stefan Labbé
trident

With a new nuclear weapons ban treaty, lines are drawn in the sand

The adoption of a ban treaty will usher in a new, divided nuclear order, with nuclear-armed states and their allies on one side and a ‘moral majority’ of states on the other, writes Paul Meyer. Where will Canada’s nuclear allegiances lie?   
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In the world’s worst crises, access to sexual and reproductive health and rights is paramount

At the Family Planning 2020 conference on July 11, Canada will have a unique opportunity to remind the international community that promoting sexual and reproductive rights during humanitarian crises saves lives — just like clean water, shelter and food. By Gillian Barth and Sandeep Prasad

BEST OF THE WEB

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Hong Kong's future

On the 20-year anniversary of the UK's handover (or return, depending on who you ask) of Hong Kong to China, Keith Bradsher of The New York Times reflects on the challenges ahead. Caught between East and West, what was once held up as an example of a modern, international city is quickly slipping into a cautionary tale of competing systems.

No good options

Donald Trump will "collide with the same harsh truth that has stymied all his recent predecessors: There are no good options for dealing with North Korea,” writes Mark Bowden for The Atlantic. For the Kim dynasty, nukes are understood to be the only option to repel a looming U.S. menace. This leaves a dangerous dilemma: a nuclear armed North Korea is worrisome, but so are the “decapitation strikes” Trump’s administration has discussed.

UPCOMING EVENTS

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11th Annual Midsummer Evening Get Together

July 19, 2017, Toronto
Please join Fraser Mann, president of the Toronto CIC branch, and other members of the executive, for this evening of networking and socializing.

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