Twitterati: The Indigenous voices edition

By: /
January 8, 2018

For this year's edition of OpenCanada's annual Twitterati list, we celebrate the contributions of Indigenous peoples to policy in Canada and on the international stage. 

From front-line advocates fighting for the environment, justice or Indigenous rights, to lawyers and policy makers with a seat at the United Nations, to the organizations holding it all together and the media outlets helping to make sense of it all, here are more than 100 social media influencers in the global Indigenous community (albeit those tweeting mostly in English) you should be following.

Get to know each one with our list below.

This year's edition is curated by Martha Troian. Illustration by Chief Lady Bird.

  • advocacy

    Tara Houska

    An Anishinaabe attorney from the Couchiching First Nation in Ontario, Tara Houska is a director for the Indigenous-led environmental organization Honor the Earth. Houska also served as an advisor on Native American issues for Bernie Sanders’s campaign and spent months demonstrating against the Dakota Access Pipeline at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation.
  • advocacy

    Clayton Thomas-Müller

    Clayton Thomas-Müller is a member of the Mathias Colomb Cree Nation, located in northern Manitoba. A "stop-it-at-the-source" campaigner with 350.org, Thomas-Müller is an internationally recognized organizer, facilitator, public speaker and writer who often tweets about Indigenous rights, and environmental and economic justice.
  • advocacy

    Melina Laboucan-Massimo

    Melina Laboucan-Massimo is a member of the Lubicon Cree First Nation in Alberta, who first emerged as a leading voice against the destruction caused to her territory by tar sands development. Now a climate change fellow at the David Suzuki Foundation, Laboucan-Massimo uses her social media presence to push for the adoption of solar and other green technologies.
  • advocacy

    Pam Palmater

    Mi'kmaw lawyer and professor Pam Palmater is the chair in Indigenous governance at Ryerson University in Toronto. A key spokesperson, organizer and educator during the Idle No More movement in 2012-13, she also came in second in the Assembly of First Nations election for national chief in 2012. She often speaks out on social media about Canada's fractured relationship with Indigenous peoples, both and home and abroad.
  • advocacy

    Ellen Gabriel

    Ellen Gabriel became a familiar face to Canadians when she was spokesperson for Kanesatake during the 1990 Oka crisis. Gabriel is a lawyer who has been active at the international level, participating in the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, negotiations on the Nagoya Protocol of the Convention on Biological diversity and, most recently, the UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
  • advocacy

    Cindy Blackstock

    A tireless advocate for the rights of Indigenous children, Cindy Blackstock is a social worker who took Canada to court for its discrimination against First Nations kids on reserve — and won. Blackstock has also worked with the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child on the development and adoption of a general comment on the rights of Indigenous children and currently serves as a commissioner for the Pan American Health Organization’s study on Health Equity and Inequity.
  • advocacy

    Maatalii Okalik

    As the 26-year-old president of the National Inuit Youth Council, Maatali Okalik is already a familiar face to the Government of Nunavut, Canada's parliament and the United Nations, where she speaks about the challenges and triumphs of Inuit youth. Alongside Environment Minister Catherine McKenna, she delivered Canada's national statement at COP22 in Marrakech, Morocco in 2016.
  • advocacy

    Russ Diabo

    A member of the Mohawk Nation at Kahnawake, Quebec, Russ Diabo is a well-known Indigenous policy advisor and writer. He is a frequent speaker at international events, including recently before the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination in Geneva, where he spoke about Indigenous peoples in Canada.
  • advocacy

    Dallas Goldtooth

    Keep It In The Ground campaign organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network, Dallas Goldtooth is also a comedian and one of the founders of the sketch comedy group, 1491s. From the UN in New York City to COP23 in Germany, Goldtooth has used his considerable social media presence to spread the word about Indigenous peoples and climate change.
  • advocacy

    Andrea Landry

    From the Pays Plat First Nation in Ontario, Andrea Landry is a political science and Indigenous studies professor at the University of Saskatchewan, who emerged as one of the loudest voices during the Idle No More movement in 2012-13. Later, as the North American representative for the United Nations Global Indigenous Youth Caucus, she spread the message internationally that Indigenous peoples should be in charge of their own destinies.
  • advocacy

    Marcia Langton

    Describing herself as a writer, anthropologist, academic and “descendant of the fighting Yiman of Queensland,” Marcia Langton uses her considerable social media following to highlight her work with Indigenous communities in Australia, North America and East Timor.
  • advocacy

    Luke Pearson

    A digital producer at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Luke Pearson is also the founder and CEO of IndigenousX, a platform for Indigenous people to share their knowledge, opinions and experiences with a wide audience of interested tweeps.
  • advocacy

    Victoria Tauli-Corpuz

    Victoria Tauli-Corpuz is the current United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. While many of her tweets are in Spanish, she shares plenty of information about global efforts by the world’s Indigenous peoples.
  • advocacy

    Tantoo Cardinal

    A well-known Cree actor and artist in Canada, Tantoo Cardinal is also an outspoken advocate for Indigenous peoples, particularly women. Through her social media presence, she often shares information about the struggles of Indigenous peoples globally.
  • advocacy

    Winona LaDuke

    An Anishinaabe activist, author and speaker on Indigenous rights, Winona LaDuke uses her considerable Twitter following to highlight environmental challenges facing Indigenous peoples, as well as to shine a light on Indigenous economies around the world.
  • advocacy

    Kevin Scannell

    Under the handle Indigenous Tweets, Kevin Scannell talks about the revitalization of Indigenous languages around the world. While much of the content is retweets, it serves as an incredibly valuable clearinghouse of information.
  • advocacy

    Adrienne Keene

    A Cherokee Nation professor, Adrienne Keene is the powerhouse behind Native Appropriations, a website that focuses primarily on the appropriation of Indigenous cultures, imagery and intellectual property, but also touches on other struggles of the world’s first peoples.
  • advocacy

    Kim TallBear

    Originally from the United States, Kim Tallbear is an associate professor in the University of Alberta Faculty of Native Studies and is also the Canada research chair in Indigenous peoples, technoscience, and environment. The contents of her tweets range from Indigenous genetics to governance to sexuality and everywhere in between.
  • advocacy

    Mark Trahant

    Journalist and academic Mark Trahant tweets about public policy, media issues and the environment in both Canada and the United States from an Indigenous perspective.
  • advocacy

    Candis Callison

    Associate professor in the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of British Columbia, Candis Callison is a Tahltan researcher whose interest in media, science, tech, anthropology and ethics takes her social media followers on a tour around the world.
  • advocacy

    Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim

    An Indigenous woman from the Mbororo pastoralist community of Chad, Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim is a regular at United Nations meetings regarding Indigenous peoples. Ibrahim uses her social media presence to speak out about Indigenous women in Chad and around the globe.
  • advocacy

    Jannie Staffansson

    A chemist by trade, Jannie Staffansson is a member of the Saami Council, which represents Indigenous peoples of Finland, Russia, Norway and Sweden. Her Twitter feed highlights her work in communities as well as at the UN level.
  • advocacy

    Gabrielle Scrimshaw

    With an MBA from Stanford, Gabrielle Scrimshaw is also a Gleitsman fellow at the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard University. A co-founder of the Aboriginal Professional Association of Canada, she tweets about Indigenous business, successes and public policy.
  • advocacy

    Sylvia McAdam

    One of the founders of the global Idle No More movement, this lawyer of Cree and Ojibway descent often tweets about issues around land, law, Indigenous governance and gender.
  • advocacy

    Chelsea Vowel

    Métis lawyer, blogger and podcaster Chelsea Vowel is the author of Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis & Inuit Issues in Canada. Through her tweets she both shines a light on the many achievements of Indigenous peoples and aims sharp criticism at racism and injustice.
  • advocacy

    Tanya Tagaq

    Her day job may be musician, but Tanya Tagaq uses her tweets to praise achievements in the Indigenous world and champion the rights of the Inuit, especially when it comes to food security and intellectual property.
  • advocacy

    Kristine Parker

    Kristine Parker, a Yuwallarai woman, is the director of Reconciliation Australia and a board member of the Indigenous Remote Communications Association (IRCA). She often tweets about Indigenous rights, reconciliation and community action.
  • advocacy

    Christina Gray

    Christina Gray is a senior research associate with the International Law Research Program at the Centre for International Governance Innovation, and sits on the board of directors of the Indigenous Bar Association. She tweets on traditional knowledge, intellectual property and all things at the intersection of international law and Indigenous rights.
  • politics

    Romeo Saganash

    A Cree member of Canada’s parliament, Romeo Saganash spent 23 years helping to draft the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples before it was adopted in 2007 by the majority of nations at the UN General Assembly, and has since been pushing for Canada to implement the declaration into law.
  • politics

    Murray Sinclair

    Now an independent member of Canada’s Senate, Murray Sinclair was the one-time head of the country’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, tasked with investigating the dark legacy of residential schools. He often tweets about justice and reconciliation issues from around the globe.
  • politics

    Perry Bellegarde

    The head of Canada's largest and oldest First Nations political organization, Perry Bellegarde often tweets about domestic issues affecting Indigenous peoples, and also makes regular appearances at meetings of the United Nations.
  • politics

    Jody Wilson-Raybould

    Canada’s first Indigenous minister of justice and attorney general, Jody Wilson-Raybould is also a lawyer and former regional chief for the Assembly of First Nations. Wilson-Raybould is a staple at Indigenous political gatherings in Canada and at the United Nations, especially for discussions around implementing the UN Indigenous rights declaration.
  • politics

    Okalik Eegeesiak

    Okalik Eegeesiakis is the elected chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, which represents over 160,000 Inuit of Alaska, Canada, Greenland and Chukotka (Russia). She tweets about Indigenous sovereignty and international Arctic issues.
  • politics

    Judith Sayers

    President of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council in British Columbia, Judith Sayers tweets about a wide range of Indigenous topics, including the environment and land, law, green technology and women’s issues.
  • politics

    Aili Keskitalo

    The president of Sami Parliament in Norway, Aili Keskitalo has a wide range of interests including language, culture, Indigenous feminism and reindeer herding. She also keeps a keen eye on issues facing Indigenous peoples elsewhere around the globe.
  • politics

    Isadore Day

    While honouring and implementing treaties between Canada and First Nations is the primary focus of Ontario Regional Chief Isadore Day’s feed, he also highlights issues facing Indigenous peoples around the world and how they relate to this country.
  • politics

    Bob Chamberlain

    From salmon farms and Crown-First Nations relations to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Chief Bob Chamberlin is a prolific tweeter about his community, the Kwikwasut'inuxw Haxwa'mis First Nation and the Indigenous world at large.
  • politics

    Sheila North Wilson

    A former broadcaster turned First Nations leader in Manitoba, Sheila North Wilson often speaks out about domestic challenges facing the people in her territory, as well as Canadian politics and international Indigenous issues.
  • politics

    Alvin Fiddler

    Alvin Fiddler is grand chief at Nishnawbe Aski Nation in Ontario and a member of Muskrat Dam First Nation. His Twitter account offers a bird’s eye view of issues related to Ontario’s First Nations, including health, policing, housing and culture, but also efforts to have Canada implement the UN Indigenous rights declaration.
  • politics

    Robert-Falcon Ouellette

    Member of parliament for Winnipeg Centre, Robert-Falcon Ouellete is one of 10 Indigenous politicians elected in 2015. While many of his tweets are about mainstream political issues, he is also an outspoken advocate for First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples.
  • politics

    Yvonne Jones

    Liberal member of parliament Yvonne Jones is an Inuk politician who tweets about gender, northern issues and the need to harmonize the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples with Canadian law.
  • politics

    Malarndirri McCarthy

    An Australian politician and former journalist, Malarndirri McCarthy has been a senator for the Northern Territory since 2016. Her tweets highlight the many achievements of Aboriginal people in her country but also the many challenges, including around citizenship, nationhood and colonialism, which apply to Indigenous peoples around the world.
  • politics

    Marama Davidson

    Maori language, rights and Indigenous law are often the focus of New Zealand member of parliament Marama Davidson’s tweets. She also discusses issues throughout the Pacific region.
  • politics

    Doug White

    Based in B.C., Snuneymuxw Chief Negotiator and Councillor Doug White tweets about the importance of treaties, law and reconciliation, as well as the place of Indigenous peoples in the global community.
  • politics

    Kelvin Davis

    One of 13 Maori ministers in New Zealand’s recently elected Labour government, Kelvin Davis is also the deputy leader and minister for Crown/Maori relations. While he’s often focused on domestic issues, he also tweets about his efforts to help Indigenous peoples in the legal, justice and correctional systems throughout the Pacific region.
  • politics

    Nanaia Mahuta

    From LGBTQ equality to Polynesian rights, Nanaia Mahuta’s Twitter account offers a glimpse into the issues facing Indigenous peoples in New Zealand and the Pacific region. She’s also the first Indigenous minister of Māori development — and the first minister to wear a facial moko, or tattoo.
  • politics

    Marama Fox

    The co-leader of the New Zealand Maori Party, Marama Fox is a long-time politician and fiery advocate for Maori rights, language and culture.
  • politics

    Margaret Froh

    Margaret Froh is a lawyer and educator, and is also president of the Métis Nation of Ontario. She tweets about Métis issues, public policy, law, reconciliation and violence against women.
  • politics

    Toby Vanlandingham

    From Indigenous intellectual property rights to tirelessly advocating for Indigenous rights in the Americas, Toby Vanlandingham’s tweets also tackle racism and oppression. An elected Yurok Tribe council member, Vanlandingham is also a co-founder of @notyourmascots.
  • politics

    Evo Morales

    The first Indigenous president of Bolivia, the Twitter presence of Evo Morales is a (mostly Spanish language) window into a country where Indigenous peoples are a majority, and highlights his efforts to eradicate poverty and resist American influence and multinational corporations.
  • politics

    Michèle Audette

    Though not a politician, Michèle Audette is no stranger to Indigenous leadership circles. A commissioner with Canada’s historic National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, Audette was once leader of the Native Women’s Association of Canada and is a constant presence at events like the Assembly of First Nations annual meetings.
  • politics

    Anna Achneepineskum

    Anna Achneepineskum is deputy grand chief of Nishnawbe Aski Nation and a citizen of Marten Falls First Nation. She uses Twitter to highlight achievements in northern Ontario as well as the challenges faced by First Nations there, including those around policing, healthcare, child welfare and government relations.
  • organizations

    The Assembly of First Nations

    As the country’s oldest and largest First Nations political organization, the Assembly of First Nations represents over 630 communities across Canada. While often focused on domestic policy issues, the AFN recently earned a seat at negotiations for NAFTA.
  • organizations

    The Native Women’s Association of Canada

    The national voice of Indigenous women’s organizations across the country, the Native Women’s Association is often credited with making the issue of missing and murdered women both a national and international issue.
  • organizations

    Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami

    Representing the country’s Inuit, the organization’s Twitter account is also a hub for political and social news from communities across Canada and the international circumpolar region.
  • organizations

    Honor the Earth

    An Indigenous-led environmental group, Honor the Earth has been one of the loudest voices in the fight for the earth in the United States and across the Americas.
  • organizations

    Indigenous Environmental Network

    An alliance of grassroots Indigenous peoples, the Indigenous Environmental Network is a Minnesota-based group that organizes resistance against a wide range of issues, including tar sands expansion and pipeline development in Indigenous communities.
  • organizations

    Lakota Law Project

    Reclaiming ancestral lands and stopping threats to Lakota land and resources is all part of the wide-ranging work of the Lakota Law Project.
  • organizations

    Reconciliation Australia

    Australia’s lead body for reconciliation, this independent, not-for-profit organization tweets about anything that promotes reconciliation between the wider Australian community and Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander people.
  • organizations

    Métis National Council

    The national voice of the Métis Nation, the Métis National Council represents its people both nationally and internationally.
  • organizations

    Pauktuutit

    As the national representative organization of Inuit women, Pauktuutit fosters greater awareness of the needs of Inuit women, advocates for equality and social improvements, and encourages their participation in the community, regional and national life of Canada.
  • organizations

    Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs

    Though focused primarily on issues facing First Nations in British Columbia, the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs discusses everything from Indigenous sovereignty and environmental protection to missing and murdered women and girls across the country.
  • organizations

    Nishnawbe Aski Nation

    Representing almost 50 First Nations in Ontario, the Nishnawbe Aski Nation is one of the loudest Indigenous political voices in Canada and often speaks about land and title on the international stage.
  • organizations

    National Congress of American Indians

    The National Congress of American Indians is the oldest, largest and most representative American Indian and Alaskan organization in the United States. It serves the interests of tribal governments and communities.
  • organizations

    Australian Human Rights Commission

    This account tweets on all things having to do with human rights in Australia. The watchdog works closely with several other national human rights institutions.
  • organizations

    The United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

    The Twitter home of Indigenous issues at the United Nations, where the world’s first peoples come to amplify their concerns on a global scale.
  • organizations

    Saami Council

    The Saami Council represents the Saami Indigenous peoples in Europe and includes member organizations from Finland, Russia, Norway and Sweden.
  • organizations

    National Congress of Australia's First Peoples

    The independent National Congress of Australia's First Peoples is the voice of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the country.
  • organizations

    Forest Peoples Programme

    An international group that advocates for the rights of "forest-dwelling" peoples, including Indigenous peoples in Africa, Asia, Central and South America.
  • organizations

    Harvard University Native American Program

    While meant to be a resource for Indigenous students at Harvard University, this Twitter account is an excellent and wide-ranging collection of links and stories about issues affecting Indigenous peoples and communities around the globe.
  • organizations

    Native Governance Center

    Based in St. Paul, Minnesota, the Indigenous-led Native Governance Center is a non-profit whose goal is strengthening tribal nations through leadership development and governance resources.
  • organizations

    National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation

    How does a country come together after the deep scars caused by Canada’s residential school system? That’s the work of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, a research centre that also hosts the largest collection of residential school materials in the country.
  • organizations

    Arctic Council

    An intergovernmental forum for Arctic governments and peoples, the Arctic Council puts a heavy emphasis on the involvement of Indigenous peoples in those regions, including the Inuit.
  • organizations

    Maori Party

    Though it didn’t fare well in the most recent New Zealand election, the Maori Party is a political organization that once held several seats in the country’s parliament and offers lessons to Indigenous peoples in Canada and abroad.
  • organizations

    The Onaman Collective

    From reclaiming Anshinaabe tattooing customs to reconnecting Indigenous youth to art, language and the land, the Onaman Collective is all about taking action and making tangible steps.
  • organizations

    International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs

    Based in Copenhagen, the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs is an independent, international body dedicated to improving the lives of the world’s Indigenous peoples.
  • media

    Cultural Survival

    Though perhaps best known for its eponymous magazine, Cultural Survival works with Indigenous peoples around the world, fostering community-based advocacy and communications, including radio, print and web training.
  • media

    Idle No More

    Though more a global Indigenous rights movement than an organization, the social media presence of Idle No More is as varied as the people who carry its banner. Tweets are about everything from sovereignty and politics to health and land.
  • media

    Native Public Media

    Based in the United States, Native Public Media not only pushes for media access for Indigenous communities but also for control and ownership.
  • media

    Maori Television

    A New Zealand-based national broadcaster, Maori Television features programmes in the the Maori language and fosters the revitalization of culture.
  • media

    APTN National News

    Canada’s only national Indigenous news program, APTN National News features stories on communities, arts, culture, language and, of course, politics and public policy. It also partners with international Indigenous broadcasters to share stories from around the globe.
  • media

    mediaINDIGENA

    What started as a blog has morphed into a popular podcast that tackles Indigenous issues in Canada and around the world.
  • media

    National Indigenous Television (NITV)

    A national broadcaster for Indigenous peoples in Australia, NITV features programs covering art, culture, language, sport and news.
  • media

    Ōiwi TV

    Billed as Hawaii’s only Native Hawaiian television station, Ōiwi TV broadcasts programs about language, culture and journalism.
  • media

    Ahni

    Ahni is a great resource for Indigenous news and information from around Canada, North America and the globe.
  • media

    Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Indigenous

    ABC’s Indigenous service includes news, culture, language and sport programs aimed at Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia.
  • media

    CBC Indigenous

    A collection of original news from Indigenous journalists at the CBC, as well as stories aggregated from across the network. Though mainly focused on domestic issues, the channel often touches on international Indigenous news.
  • media

    Indigenous Journalism

    A clearinghouse of all things Indigenous journalism, current affairs, opinion and writing. The emphasis is on Canadian-based news but the feed occasionally strays into international Indigenous issues.
  • media

    Simon Moya-Smith

    Twitter account of Simon Moya-Smith, an Oglala and Chicano journalist who has written for Indian Country Today and the Denver Post, and makes appearances on CNN, NBC News, MTV and NPR, to name but a few.
  • media

    Angela Sterritt

    Angela Sterritt is an award-winning Gitxsan journalist and OpenCanada contributor. She is currently the host of Reconcile This with CBC Vancouver. She tweets on all things Indigenous, journalism and human rights, especially with regards to missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.
  • media

    Hayden King

    A Gchi'mnissing Anishinaabe writer and educator with Ryerson University in Toronto, Hayden King is a fierce, critical voice within Canada's Twittersphere, often calling out blindspots in education and media sectors around Indigenous concerns.
  • media

    IndigenousX

    An independent Indigenous media organization that uses Twitter to amplify the voices of Indigenous peoples from Australia and Canada. Check in each week to see who takes over the Twitter accounts.
  • media

    Tristan Ahtone

    Twitter account of Neiman Foundation fellow and Kiowa reporter Tristan Ahtone, who tweets about issues in Indigenous journalism, as well as about public policy, mainly in the United States.
  • media

    Mary Hudetz

    Twitter account of Mary Hudetz, a member of the Crow Tribe, who is a reporter for the Associated Press and is a past president of the Native American Journalists Association. She tweets about her coverage of crime, justice, policing and Indigenous peoples.
  • media

    Connie Walker

    A leading voice for news on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, Connie Walker co-hosts a podcast for CBC News on the issue. She is one of the best known and widely respected Indigenous journalists in Canada.
  • media

    Reporting in Indigenous Communities

    The brainchild of respected Anishinaabe journalist Duncan McCue (@duncanmccue), RIIC is an online educational resource for journalists covering Indigenous peoples that also shares stories about Indigenous issues from around the globe. It is an excellent tool for those looking to decolonize their journalism.
  • media

    Jenni Monet

    Jenni Monet is a freelance journalist with bylines in PBS, Public Radio International and Al Jazeera. She writes about the Indigenous experience in a way that audiences around the world can understand and appreciate.
  • media

    Terri Hansen

    A Winnebego journalist, Terri Hansen reports on science, climate, culture and, of course, Indigenous peoples, both nationally and globally. Hansen has bylines in Earth Island Journal, Yes Magazine and Indian Country Today, to name a few.
  • media

    Red Man Laughing Podcast

    Started by Anishinaabe comic Ryan McMahon, the RML podcast features lively discussions about how Indigenous realities collide with the mainstream. Now in its sixth season.
  • media

    Duncan McCue

    Duncan McCue is a highly respected journalist, currently the host of CBC Radio One Cross Country Checkup. McCue is Anishinaabe, and was part of a CBC Aboriginal investigation into missing and murdered Indigenous women that won numerous honours.
  • media

    Tim Fontaine

    Tim Fontaineis the editor-in-grand-chief and head writer for Walking Eagle News, a popular online satirical news site. Fontaine has worked for APTN National News, iChannel, CPAC and CBC Indigenous.
  • media

    Waubgeshig Rice

    Waubgeshig Rice, originally from Wasauksing First Nation, is a multi-platform journalist working for the CBC, and is also working on his second novel. He tweets and shares news about a host of important Indigenous issues and events.